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Sunday, May 19, 2024

US House Approves Legislation to Include Citizenship Query in Census, Split Along Party Lines

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — A contentious ⁢bill,​ proposing the addition of a citizenship‌ query to the U.S. census and a modification in the allocation of House seats and presidential electors, received approval from the U.S. House on Wednesday.

However,​ this doesn’t necessarily guarantee the bill’s ultimate success.

The ⁣Equal Representation Act, also known as HR7109, was passed with a narrow margin of 206-202, strictly along party lines. The four House ‍members from⁤ Utah — Reps. Blake Moore, John Curtis, Burgess Owens, and​ Celeste Maloy — sided with their Republican peers in voting in favor of the bill. However, with Democrats holding the majority in the U.S. ‍Senate,​ the future of the bill​ remains uncertain.

Despite this, the revival ​of this push highlights the ongoing focus of many⁢ legislators on matters pertaining to immigration and undocumented immigrants. This type of change, as outlined​ in HR7109,⁤ was previously advocated for ‍by former President Donald Trump during his tenure, albeit without success.

The‍ proposed​ bill would introduce a question in the U.S. Census Bureau’s next headcount, slated for 2030, asking respondents to confirm their U.S. citizenship. Supporters of the‌ bill argue ​that this ‌question would provide a more accurate understanding of the U.S. population’s composition. Detractors, however, ​worry that the question could deter some immigrants from participating in ​the census, even though they wouldn’t be required ‌to disclose their immigration status.

Furthermore, the bill proposes to allocate​ U.S. House seats and presidential⁣ electors based on the‍ number of U.S. citizens in a specific⁣ jurisdiction, rather than‍ the total population, including immigrants.

Advocates for this change argue that the current method ⁢of allocation results in an unfair​ representation, favoring states with large immigrant populations. Opponents,​ on the ⁢other hand, believe that the proposed change would violate​ the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. They further contend that‌ immigrants, as taxpayers, deserve representation in the country.

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Truth Media Network
Truth Media Network
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3 COMMENTS

  1. Disagree – including a citizenship question could discourage participation and lead to an inaccurate count.

  2. Disagree – adding a citizenship question could deter participation from immigrant communities, leading to an incomplete and inaccurate census.

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